Home Uncategorized Stuart Murdoch Responds to Article on Racism in Indie Rock: “Aw, F*ck Off”

Stuart Murdoch Responds to Article on Racism in Indie Rock: “Aw, F*ck Off”

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Pitchfork has been nailing it lately. They recently started a
discussion in the electronic music community with an article
titled “EDM Has a Problem With Women, and It’s Getting
Worse
“.
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Yesterday, Pitchfork posted an article by Sarah Sahim titled
The Unbearable Whiteness of
Indie
.  The article starts off by
criticizing Stuart Murdoch of Belle & Sebastian for his
film God Help the Girl.  Murdoch purposefully
cast white lead actors in the film about a young woman
with anorexia:

“As a lover of Belle and Sebastian, I was disappointed,
though certainly not surprised.  Over their entire
discography, a grand total of two people of color have graced
their album artwork, appearing on the cover of
Storytelling.  While Storytelling
commodifies the cover girls’ culture, Belle and Sebastian
commodify Whiteness; God Help the Girl merely
underscores this.  The film itself is an egregious mess
that romanticizes a woman’s struggles with an eating disorder
for the sake of Murdoch’s self-promotion.  The
optimistic, happy-go-lucky and painstakingly adorable
aesthetic evidenced in every character he created is founded
in Whiteness.  Whiteness is beauty; Whiteness is what
gives the character the ability to dream of fostering a
career in music; Whiteness is what enables the audience to
empathize with Eve’s character.  A recurring filler in
the film was a fictitious radio show where two men try to
decipher what “real” indie is and every band mentioned is
white, enforcing the film’s aspirational Whiteness.
 While Belle and Sebastian aren’t the
only examples of perpetuating Whiteness through indie rock,
this movie serves as a microcosmic view of what is
wrought by racial exclusivity that is omnipresent in indie
rock.

Stuart Murdoch responded to the article on Twitter today…

 

 

 

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